Tag Archives: Atheism

Event Report: Old religion and new spirituality 26th-29th May 2015

In this post, Atko Remmel discusses the conference ‘Old religion and new spirituality: continuity and changes in the background of secularization’. held at the University of Tartu, Estonia (26th-29th  May 2015). The event was organized by the research group of religious studies of the … Continue reading

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Time to name a movement?

In this post, Ryan Cragun asks if it is time to give nonreligious movements a name. If so, what might this name be? And how, as an academic, can he avoid the pitfalls of labeling a group from the outside – rather than … Continue reading

Posted in Expanding the Field, NSRN Blog, Research Questions | Tagged , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

The Blind Spot in the Study of Religion

Religion’s Impact on the Nonbelievers In this post [i],  Petra Klug, discusses what questions may be raised regarding the definition of religion, in light of a recent focus on, and understandings of, nonreligious and irreligious populations.  In recent years, we’ve … Continue reading

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Discourse Analysis and the Study of Atheism: Definitions, Discourse, and Ethnographic Criticism

In this post Ethan Quillen explores a discursive approach to atheism (and nonreligion) following the theoretical work of von Stuckrad (2003). Quillen suggests that researchers in this area move away from definitions and wrangling over the the meaning of words, and concentrate instead on … Continue reading

Posted in Methods and Methodologies, NSRN Blog, Reflections from the field, Research Questions | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Sam Harris’ “Waking Up” Spotlights the Possibility of Secular Spirituality

In this post Kyle Thompson reviews Sam Harris’ new book. In it Thompson explores Harris’ argument that spirituality and nonreligion are compatible signalling an interesting departure from his scientific atheist perspective. Thompson argues that this shift in atheist discourse is one researchers of nonreligion should … Continue reading

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The BASR Atheism and Nonreligion Panel

On 4th September 2014 Lorna Mumford was part of the ‘Discursive and Material Approaches to the Study of Atheism and Non-religion’ panel at the British Association for the Study of Religions’ annual conference hosted by The Open University in Milton … Continue reading

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God-blasters vs Philosophical Atheists: Real and Perceived Divisions Among Unbelievers

Elliot Hanowski draws on the history of Canadian unbelief to argue that ideological labels should not overshadow the pragmatic way unbelievers of all stripes actually behaved when dealing with the broader society. Ideas never stay pure and unadulterated when they … Continue reading

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Event Report: The Association for the Sociology of Religion Annual Meeting

Amanda Schutz sat in on a session covering issues of nonreligion at the Association for the Sociology of Religion annual meeting, which took place in San Francisco, California, 13th-15th of August. Here, she shares her interpretations of these presentations and … Continue reading

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A Dialectic Atheology – Understanding the Past, Present and Future of Atheism

Charles Devellennes sets out his ideas for developing a dialectic theory of atheology, as an alternative to attempting to unify different forms of atheism. Is there a continuity between various strands of atheism, despite all of their differences? This important … Continue reading

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Review: 50 Voices of Disbelief

Eric Chalfant reviews Blackford and Schüklenk’s 50 Voices of Disbelief (2009), and notes that, although intended for a lay audience, the plurality of personal narratives and experiences recounted by contributors to the book serves as a reminder to academic researchers … Continue reading

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